The Hero and the Crown

The Hero and the Crown

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Aerin, with the guidance of the wizard Luthe and the help of the blue sword, wins the birthright due her as the daughter of the Damarian king and a witchwoman of the mysterious, demon-haunted North.
Publisher: ** E-Book // Click on DOWNLOAD link to place holds
Edition: EBOOK TEXT
ISBN: 9781497673656
Branch Call Number: EBOOK TEXT
Alternative Title: OverDrive

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j
JihadiConservative
May 27, 2015

Its a classic. But, I did not like this high fantasy story of a underdog shepherd who defeats the dragon...Thats Old fantasy. To old for me. I like very gritty thick epic political fantasies (this sub genre I like is Grimdark) Grimdark fantasy is the best (Game of Thrones) is an epic example. This was to happy for me. Nothing exciting or intense happened and I knew exactly what was going to happen...

c
cham
Mar 02, 2015

This beautifully written book is near perfect and I only gave it a 4.5 stars is because I don't know what a perfect book is but The Hero and the Crown is up there.

e
erin89
Dec 04, 2014

I own this book, and it is a well loved copy. Aerin is a great character and I wish there would have been more to the Damar series then this one and The Blue Sword.

j
julia_sedai
Oct 21, 2013

Robin McKinley is fantastic. I loved the character of Aerin and her writing style is also really amazing. I did like The Blue Sword more than this one, though, but I liked having a prequel to it as well. I wish she had written more books in the Chronicles of Damar series.

r
rixonkarla
Aug 24, 2012

I definitely like the first half of the book better than the second half, but that said, this is one of my favorite books. I don't usually buy books, but this is one I own, because I know I'll want to re-read it many times.

a
adelaideblair
Jul 23, 2012

I've read this book a couple of times, and while it starts out great, it always disappoints in the end. It's a prequel of sorts to "The Blue Sword" and has none of that book's great storytelling. Aerin works hard to find a place in her father's court, but after she develops her initial skills, magical accidents and coincidences save the day. She's a Mary Sue character who is progressed through the story by outside forces. This would have been a much better story if it had not tried so hard to match the world of "The Blue Sword", but it is still worth a read if you are a McKinley fan.

Yavril Jul 13, 2012

A rich bold story that gets to the core of "The Hero's" feelings.

Wonderful, slightly challenging read. The description is a bit off, but I'll let it go. Aerin is one of my favorite characters ever, and I'm sure she'll be yours too, she's charming, realistic, and fearless. Great book!

2
22950006336531
Jun 29, 2011

The description of this book, first of all, isn't very accurate; first of all, Luthe isn't a wizard. Now, for the book itself ... This is my favourite of all Robin McKinley's books -- the characters are the most alive of any characters she has portrayed, and the story is riveting. I have read it SO many times that I know it by heart. Aerin now lives in my mind as one of my heroes. The word I thought summed the book up for me was: refreshing. I felt awakened and alive and refreshed once I had finished, and immediately began reading it again.

lieslok Mar 10, 2011

Anyone looking for a book with a strong, female protagonist, dragons, and a hint of romance has found the perfect book! It was one of my first books I read in the fantasy genre as a child and it still remains one of my favorite books. You will not be disappointed!

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julia_sedai
Oct 21, 2013

julia_sedai thinks this title is suitable for 15 years and over

Yavril Jul 13, 2012

Yavril thinks this title is suitable for 11 years and over

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Yavril Jul 13, 2012

Aerin is the daughter of the king of Damar, King Arlbeth. But even though she is the king's daughter, Aerin was never fully accepted. Most of the common folk, and many others, believe her mother was a witchwoman, who cast a spell on the king to marry him, and have a child, who would rule Damar after Arlbeth. They beleive she died from her grief of bearing a girl not a boy, as a girl could not rule. Aerin always questioned herself, even though those closest to her tried to make her believe that her mother was very frail, and could not live through childbirth. But Aerin just went on questioning.
In this story, Aerin finds meaning.

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