Little Fish

Little Fish

A Memoir From A Different Kind of Year

Book - 2013
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"Told through real-life journals, collages, lists, and drawings, this coming-of-age story illustrates the transformation of an 18-year-old girl from a small-town teenager into an independent city-dwelling college student. Written in an autobiographical style with beautiful artwork, Little Fish shows the challenges of being a young person facing the world on her own for the very first time and the unease--as well as excitement--that comes along with that challenge."-- From publisher's web site.
Publisher: San Francisco : Zest Books, 2013
ISBN: 9781936976188
1936976188
Characteristics: 1 volume (unpaged) : chiefly ill. ; 22 cm

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l
LailaMLucas
Jun 29, 2016

Rally good book

LPL_MiriamW Jun 03, 2016

A fantastic read for any teen leaving home for the first time. Whether heading out to college in some far away town, like the main character in this autobiographical graphic novel, or just setting out on your own, this book has fantastic insight into what it's really like to make such a big change in your life. Beyer's drawings of her first year of college life are interspersed with actual journal entries from that time and lists of whatever she happened to be thinking about. All together they give a realistic and engaging picture of life away from home and how it affects friendships, family, and how you think about yourself.

LibraryK8 Oct 03, 2014

A touching memoir of uncertainty, adventure, and a little soul searching (as is appropriate in a freshman year in the big city), join Ramsey as she explores her experiences at art school. Her experience is universal and any reader can understand the search for a place to fit in, the fear of old friendships changing, and the uncertainty of the future.

OranguTang Aug 22, 2014

I didn't really like this book. It just seemed a little too wide-eyed and the subject matter has been done a million times before (A small town girl in the big city? How will I ever fit in? What am I going to with my life? Gosh, college is great! Does this boy like me? Do I even like him?) I didn't like the writing style either with all of the lists and scraps of paper but I think that's a personal thing.

e
elloyd74
Feb 02, 2014

Doubt. Wistfulness. Growing consciousness. Growing confidence. Homesickness while at school, schoolsickness while at home. Actively trying to grow and carefully examining one's growth. Meeting people your age with convictions. Not having convictions yet. Deciding who you are and what you like. In a skillfully put-together book that feels effortlessly put-together (and includes many lists and blurbs from the zine she made when she was first beginning art school), Ramsey Beyer evokes the big weirdnesses and small wonderfulnesses of one's first year away from home and in school (in her case, art school, but more broadly, college).

As an adult reader, it made me nostalgic--especially Beyer's cataloging of the seemingly mundane new traditions (weekly dates to pile into someone's room and watch The OC, getting Chinese from a restaurant called Eat Must Be First every Saturday) and experiments (let's all straighten our hair--even the boys--and take pictures on a lazy afternoon) with new friends that cumulatively add up to deeper levels of intimacy. I feel like I would've been interested in reading it if I could have before leaving for school--but I still need to recommend it to teens (it's marketed as a YA book) in that position and see how it speaks to them.

The last page could not be more perfect.

JCLOctavia Dec 09, 2013

First year of college is always an adventure. Ramsey Beyer doesn't just tell you about it, she draws about it too.

JCLEmmaF Dec 03, 2013

I have never opened a graphic novel and I have never felt any inclination to do so. I shelved this book at work and for some reason went back and opened it. It was what I saw that made me smile, that made me check out the book and read it in two sittings, in one night.

When I opened the book, the format reminded me of a zine, which is a latest obsession of mine. Scrapbook pages and typewriter written words and sweet cartoons and jottings. I loved it.

The whole book is amazing. The thing you have to remember though, is that it's not like a novel. The storytelling isn't the way it usually is. This is a memoir in a unique format. It's snippets of a life. Yes, it really could have been more in depth, but the way it is is just the way it is. It's nor normal so don't say it needs to be. Because it doesn't.

It inspired me so much too! It inspired me to make more lists and to use my typewriter more, just to type up little things I already have written. It inspired me to find more concerts, to make more zines (and to find Ramsey Beyer's zines... I want one rather badly). and more... Inspiring books are the best I think.

The story itself is very light and loose. It's not really a plot, it's a life, as in the Vinyl Princess, another of my favorite books. I lovelovelove the main character, Ramsey. She's sweet and so cute. Actually, I loved all the characters. I liked the book because it was soft and light, with things you could identify with. It made me happy. Also, as a senior, it was fun to read a college freshman's thoughts... I really did adore this book and I'm asking for it for Christmas so... teehee ;)

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l
LailaMLucas
Jun 29, 2016

Ramsey Beyer grew up in small town Michigan, dreaming of going to art school in a big city. Although she loved growing up in a rural area, she longed for the diversity and challenge of an urban life. So when it came time to apply to schools she looked for art schools in her favorite big cities, eventually settling on a well-respected institution in Baltimore.
With her freshman year of art school and a move to a big city looming ahead, Ramsey began to worry that she would miss her rural life. Between rigorous foundation classes and learning to live with roommates, Ramsey kept meticulous journals, expressing her worries about future careers, making and loosing friends, and finding romance.

LibraryK8 Oct 03, 2014

Ramsey Beyer grew up in small town Michigan, dreaming of going to art school in a big city. Although she loved growing up in a rural area, she longed for the diversity and challenge of an urban life. So when it came time to apply to schools she looked for art schools in her favorite big cities, eventually settling on a well-respected institution in Baltimore.
With her freshman year of art school and a move to a big city looming ahead, Ramsey began to worry that she would miss her rural life. Between rigorous foundation classes and learning to live with roommates, Ramsey kept meticulous journals, expressing her worries about future careers, making and loosing friends, and finding romance.

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